Finished Research Projects

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Fashion Prediction Conference

Fashion predictions have played a tremendous role in the transformation of the fashion industry worldwide since the interwar period. However, it is still a poorly known business despite the fact that it influenced dramatically the collections every season. Although Intermediaries and Mediators have been active in the consolidating process of the Fashion Industry, their role has only been discussed recently by scholars.

The aim of this one-day public conference is to explore the different forms and evolution of Fashion prediction worldwide since the interwar period. Fashion prediction was and is exercised in different ways and by means of different institutions, including consulting companies, dedicated spaces during trade-fairs, department stores, dedicated divisions in major companies, and more recently, bloggers and internet trendsetting companies. The role and form of Fashion predictions thus changed over time. This conference aims to find out how and why.

Organised by: Dr Thierry Maillet and Dr Ben Wubs
History

 

‘Reason of state’ or ‘reason of princess’?

A new synthesis about the transformation of early modern rule is necessary, since older assumptions about the making of an institutional bureaucratic state have been undermined. As a consequence, early modern comments on ‘reason of state’ need to be re-interpreted. They were often (mis-)understood as mirroring the gradual replacement of medieval rule based on personal ties and Christian values by institutionalized power states. Since the 1950s, many of the assumptions on which this interpretation was based have been questioned.

The project will re-interpret these comments as ‘reason of princes’, analyzing the fundamental transformation in the nature of early modern rule not in terms of state building, but as driven by participation in war on an unprecedented scale and by new constellations within society backing up the enormous increases in war related burdens. It will summarise this new constellation as ‘new monarchy’.

Period: 2011-2015
Research leader:
Prof. Robert von Friedeburg
History

 

Cultural transmission and artistic exchanges in the Low Countries, 1572-1672

This research project seeks to investigate the artistic exchanges that took place between the Dutch Republic and the Southern Netherlands during the years 1572 and 1672. We wish to gain insight into the circulation of artistic knowledge and examine how culture was transferred. Therefore, this project will examine how changes and innovation in the visual arts occurred as a result of ‘foreign’ influences caused by the mobility of artists (producers), the art trade (products), and exchanges of artistic knowledge (ideas). This research program will enable us to point to the origins of the shared (cultural) heritage of both the Northern and Southern Netherlands, and perhaps more importantly, shed light on the complicated but fascinating process of cultural transmission in European History.

Period: 2009-2014
Research leaders:
Dr Filip Vermeylen, Dr Karolien De Clippel (UU), Prof. Eric Jan Sluijter (UvA)
Team:
Dr Claartje Rasterhoff (UvA), Marloes Hemmer MA (UU), David van der Linden MA (UU)
Arts and Culture Studies

NWO Programme Heritage Education

This research programme examines how heritage education in a multicultural and globalizing society can contribute to the construction of shared historical knowledge, while acknowledging different perspectives on the past. The research program has two aims. First, the program intends to investigate and reflect on the opportunities of heritage education with regard to disciplinary foundations, goals and approaches. Second, on a practical level the aim is to develop a benchmark model for dynamic and professional heritage education and to stimulate its integration in the curriculum of primary and secondary Dutch schools.

Period: 2009-2014
Research leaders:
Prof. Maria Grever (supervisor program) and Prof. Carla van Boxtel
Team:
Dr Stephan Klein, Pieter de Bruijn, Geerte Savenije
History

 

HERA-POPID Popular Music Heritage, Cultural Memory and Cultural Identity

POPID explores the relationship between popular music and contemporary renderings of cultural identity and local and national cultural heritage in a pan-European context. With a history now stretching back over fifty years, popular music forms such as rock and punk may be as potent a symbol of national or local identity as traditional representations, for example, national and regional insignia, food, drink, and sport. By looking at the articulations of popular music heritage in specific European contexts, POPID examines popular music's contribution to the narratives of cultural identity and representations of cultural memories. Furthermore, it explores how these articulations are re-articulated and negotiated in the business practices of the global popular music industry.

Period: 2010-2013
Research leaders:
Prof. Susanne Janssen (Project Leader), Prof. Sara Cohen, Prof. Alfred Smudits, Prof. Peter Stanković
Team (Netherlands):
Dr Amanda Brandellero, Arno van der Hoeven, Simone Driessen, Sharon van Noord
Media and Communication

 

PoliMedia - Interlinking MultiMedia for the analysis of media coverage of political debates

Analysing media coverage across several types of media-outlets is a challenging task for (media) historians. Up until now, the focus has been on newspaper articles: being generally available in digital, computer-readable format, these can be studied relatively easily. Cross-media comparisons between different types of media-outlets have however rarely been undertaken, even though such comparisons have top priority on the wish-list of (media) historians as this could give better insight into the choices that different media-outlets make.

The PoliMedia project aims to showcase the potential of cross-media analysis for research in the humanities, by (i) curating automatically detected semantic links between four data sets of different media types, and (ii) developing a demonstrator application that allows researchers to deploy such an interlinked collection for quantitative and qualitative analysis of media coverage of debates in the Dutch parliament.

Period: 2012-2013
Research leaders:
Prof. Henri Beunders
Team:
Martijn Kleppe MA, Max Kemman MSc, TU Delft, VU en het Nederlands Instituut voor Beeld en Geluid
History & Media and Communication

 

Cultural Classification Systems in Transition

The comparative study of cultural classification systems - that is, the ways in which members of particular societies classify cultural products and develop corresponding rules of behavior and practices - constitutes a very challenging, emerging field of research. It can greatly improve our understanding of the social nature of artistic valuation processes and practices, and, moreover, it can shed light on underlying, broader processes of social and cultural change.

This research programme aims at clarifying and qualifying the changes that seem to have occurred in the classification of cultural products in (different) western societies.

Period: 2003-2012
Research leader:
Prof. Susanne Janssen
Team:
Dr Giselinde Kuipers, Dr Marc Verboord, Pauwke Berkers, Femke van Hest, Annemarie Kersten, Alex van Venrooij, Vaughn Schmutz
Arts and Culture Studies / Media and Communication

 

AXES

The goal of AXES is to develop tools that provide various types of users with new engaging ways to interact with audiovisual libraries, helping them discover, browse, navigate, search and enrich archives. In particular, apart from a search-oriented scheme, we will explore how suggestions for audiovisual content exploration can be generated via a myriad of information trails crossing the archive. This will be approached from three perspectives (or axes): users, content, and technology.

Research leaders: Prof. Henri Beunders
Team:
Martijn Kleppe MA, Gert Goris
History & Media and Communication

 

Community Museums Past & Present

This project focuses on integration processes and the interaction between political and museological agendas; about the evolution of the canon from tangible to intangible heritage; and about new exhibition techniques and ICT applications inside and outside the museum. All these developments converge in the community museum and will redefine it in the 21th century.

Period: 2008–2012
Research leaders:
Prof. M.E. Halbertsma, Prof. van de Laar, Prof. M. Jacobs
Arts and Culture Studies

 

Private Wealth and Public Office

The modern predicament of (inter)national politics invites a co-ordinated investigation of the structures of political development in early-modern Europe and America (16th-18th centuries), with special attention to church-state relations, the economy (relations between economic and political elites, jealousy of trade, early capitalism for short) and the relations of citizens and their government. The changing religious experience and organisation, the increasing international competition within and outside Europe, in combination with increasing demands on political organisation of the world before the French Revolution have obtained a new relevance by recent events. Co-operation of early-modern scholars from different disciplines is called for, as is co-operation across the 'Atlantic divide'.

Period: 2005-2010
Researchers:
Prof. Robert von Friedeburg and Hans Blom (FSW)
History

 

Globalisation and Cultural Heritage

Up until 1945, collecting and preserving cultural heritage in public or semi-public institutions such as museums, archives, libraries, listed monuments, and archaeological sites was an activity carried out largely in the West. In the last twenty years, developments in communication and transport have made cultural heritage available to a world public.

This project is meant to analyse and clarify recent global developments in cultural heritage and its institutions, on both a macro- and micro-scale. The connection between globalisation and cultural heritage will be analysed in two separate publications: a monograph on fundamental theoretical and conceptual aspects of globalisation and cultural heritage, and a dissertation on cultural tourism in the Black Atlantic and its implications for heritage institutions in Africa and the Caribbean.

Period: 2005-2009
Research leaders:
Prof. Marlite Halbertsma and Prof. Alex van Stipriaan Luïscius
Arts and Culture Studies

 

Conquest, Competition and Ideology

The breaking away of the United Provinces from the Spanish Empire implied the end of the holy trinity of Common Good, Monarchy and Divine Providence. It opened the path towards new practices and new ways of thinking about the nature and purposes of government and private public relations. The realist, even sceptical raison d'état that inspired the monarchies of Europe was gradually replaced by a bourgeois reason of state that considered trade not only the sinews of war, but its proper replacement. All three elements of the holy trinity became essentially contested and thereby changed the practice of governance as well as its ideology.

This programme aims at considering exemplary episodes in this process in order to rewrite the general story of this development, in order to contribute to our understanding of the dynamics of this highly innovative period in the history of Western governance. The programme aims at demonstrating that the Dutch Republic is justifiably the first case in European history of a system of governance (nonhierarchical, conscious application of private public partnership). Moreover, it will enumerate and analyze the difficulties and prospects involved in its introduction.

Period: 2005-2009
Research leaders:
Prof. Robert von Friedeburg and Dr Hans Blom (FSW)
History

 

Controlling Time and Shaping the Self

The key question of the project is to what extent and in what ways the specific contents and forms of egodocuments as well as the increase in their number in the long nineteenth century were related to the emergence of a new sense of temporality, both on an individual level, through the medium of pedagogical intervention, and in the public sphere. The traditional wisdom concerning the links between autobiographical writing, growing introspection and individualization will be questioned. In my view, while writing to control temporal experience, the nineteenth-century autobiographers inadvertently reflected on themselves and shaped their own individuality.

Period: 2002-2008
Research leader
: Dr Arianne Baggerman
Team:
Dr R. Dekker, E. Grabowsky MA, M. Huisman MA, M. de Jong-IJsselstein MA, J. Kuyvenhoven-Broek MA, G. Schulte Nordholt MA, J. Blaak MA
History

 

Paradoxes of De-Canonization

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Rotterdam - Antwerp 1880-2000

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