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Research Projects

A Rhine economy, 1850-2000

Artistic Exchange Project

HERA-POPID Popular Music Heritage, Cultural Memory and Cultural Identity

NWO Programme Heritage Education

NWO History textbook Research Humanities

NWO Valorization Dynamic heritage education

‘Reason of state’ or ‘reason of princess’?

Cultural Classification Systems in Transition

 Axes

PoliMedia - Interlinking MultiMedia for the analysis of media coverage of political debates

Community Museums Past & Present

Globalisation and Cultural Heritage

 Summary of the projects

A Rhine economy, 1850-2000

This research program consists of four projects, all concentrating on the Dutch-German relationship in the Rhine economy of 1850 to 2000. During this last one and a half century the Rhine River became the foremost commercial inland waterway of Europe. Central questions are, what where the consequences of the economic development for the political relations between the diverse countries along the Rhine river? How did cross-border economic relations influence the economic development in the diverse Rhine States and what consequence did the fact that the economic development took place in a shattered political surrounding had for the development of firms and groups of firms?

Research leaders: Prof. Hein A.M. Klemann and Dr. Ben Wubs

Team: Drs. Jeroen Euwe, PhD-student; Drs. Martijn Lak, PhD-student; Drs. Joep Schenk, PhD-student; Drs. Marten Boon, PhD-student; Drs. Klára Paardenkooper, PhD-student

History

A Rhine economy, 1850-2000

 

Artistic Exchange Project

This research project seeks to investigate the artistic exchanges that took place between the Dutch Republic and the Southern Netherlands during the years 1572 and 1672. We wish to gain insight into the circulation of artistic knowledge and examine how culture was transferred. Therefore, this project will examine how changes and innovation in the visual arts occurred as a result of ‘foreign’ influences caused by the mobility of artists (producers), the art trade (products), and exchanges of artistic knowledge (ideas). This research program will enable us to point to the origins of the shared (cultural) heritage of both the Northern and Southern Netherlands, and perhaps more importantly, shed light on the complicated but fascinating process of cultural transmission in European History.

Period: 2009-2014

Research leaders: Dr. Filip Vermeylen, Dr. Karolien De Clippel, Prof.dr. Eric Jan Sluijter

Team: Dr. Claartje Rasterhoff, Marloes Hemmer MA, David van der Linden MA

Arts and Culture Studies

Artistic Exchange Project

 

HERA-POPID Popular Music Heritage, Cultural Memory and Cultural Identity

POPID explores the relationship between popular music and contemporary renderings of cultural identity and local and national cultural heritage in a pan-European context. With a history now stretching back over fifty years, popular music forms such as rock and punk may be as potent a symbol of national or local identity as traditional representations, for example, national and regional insignia, food, drink, and sport. By looking at the articulations of popular music heritage in specific European contexts, POPID examines popular music's contribution to the narratives of cultural identity and representations of cultural memories. Furthermore, it explores how these articulations are re-articulated and negotiated in the business practices of the global popular music industry.

Period: 2010-2013

Research leaders: Prof.dr. Susanne Janssen (Project Leader), Prof.dr. Sara Cohen, Prof.dr. Alfred Smudits, Prof.dr. Peter Stanković

Team (Netherlands): Dr. Amanda Brandellero, Arno van der Hoeven, Simone Driessen, Sharon van Noord

Media and Communication

HERA-POPID Popular Music Heritage, Cultural Memory and Cultural Identity

 

NWO Programme Heritage Education

This research program examines how heritage education in a multicultural and globalizing society can contribute to the construction of shared historical knowledge, while acknowledging different perspectives on the past. The research program has two aims. First, the program intends to investigate and reflect on the opportunities of heritage education with regard to disciplinary foundations, goals and approaches. Second, on a practical level the aim is to develop a benchmark model for dynamic and professional heritage education and to stimulate its integration in the curriculum of primary and secondary Dutch schools.

Period: 2009-2014

Research leaders: prof.dr. Maria Grever (supervisor program) and prof.dr. Carla van Boxtel

Team: Dr. Stephan Klein, Pieter de Bruijn, Geerte Savenije

History

NWO Programme Heritage Education


NWO PhD project History textbook Resaarch Humanities

PhD Student Tina van der Vlies MA (2011-2016)
Historical scholarship and school history: national narratives in Dutch and English textbooks, 1920-2010

A frequent complaint in Western society is that young people are ignorant of the history of their country of residence. Politicians as well as some prominent historians blame school history for not offering a convincing vision of the national past. Most history educators, however, are of a different opinion. Why the relationship between historical scholarship and school history is problematical is not clear. This research project seeks to analyze specific aspects of this relationship: the narration of the nation in history textbooks.

The research question of my project is: How have developments in historical scholarship influenced the construction of national narratives in Dutch and English history textbooks for secondary education between 1920-2010, and what were possible dynamic interactions between scholarship and school history? The research period covers major developments since the 1920s, apart from the history profession: 1. Global transformations on domestic issues and the public self-image of both countries (since 1920 continuation of colonial framing of both nations; after 1945 de-colonization; in the 1960s a mellowing of nationalism in post-war Europe; since the 1990s re-nationalization); 2. National education policies and regulations; 3. The rise of educational studies; 4. The changing textbook market and emerging new media. The project seeks to elucidate the relationship between historical scholarship and school history. It will investigate continuities and discontinuities in presenting national history in Dutch/English textbooks, and will support teachers by enhancing their insights in the changing contents and standards of history textbooks.

Period: 2011 - 2016

Supervisor prof.dr. Maria Grever;

Co-supervisors dr. Stephan Klein en dr. Jacques Dane, National Museum of Education Rotterdam

History

NWO History textbook Research Humanities

 

NWO Valorization Dynamic heritage education

Applicant and supervisor: prof. dr. Maria Grever
Project leader: dr. Stephan Klein

Recent dynamic approaches to heritage have implications for the learning of history. The aim of dynamic heritage education is to stimulate cultural and historical consciousness among youngsters through critical reflection on material and immaterial traces from the past. It stimulates school students to explain representations of the past from different perspectives, with respect to historical facts. This way, they gain insight in why groups and individuals through time can experience, articulate and interpret the past differently. This project will develop dynamic heritage education around the topic of the transatlantic slave trade and slavery. A design team, supported by an advisory board, will develop an educational website(Dutch / English) for students in secondary education (13-15 year olds). Dissemination of this dynamic approach among teachers and education officers will take place through newsletters, professional publications and training sessions.

The project is funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). It received an additional grant from the Foundation for the Remembrance of Slavery 2013.

History

NWO Valorization Dynamic heritage education

 

‘Reason of state’ or ‘reason of princess’?

A new synthesis about the transformation of early modern rule is necessary, since older assumptions about the making of an institutional bureaucratic state have been undermined. As a consequence, early modern comments on ‘reason of state’ need to be re-interpreted. They were often (mis-)understood as mirroring the gradual replacement of medieval rule based on personal ties and Christian values by institutionalized power states. Since the 1950s, many of the assumptions on which this interpretation was based have been questioned. The project will re-interpret these comments as ‘reason of princes’, analyzing the fundamental transformation in the nature of early modern rule not in terms of state building, but as driven by participation in war on an unprecedented scale and by new constellations within society backing up the enormous increases in war related burdens. It will summarize this new constellation as ‘new monarchy’.

Period: 2011-2015

Research leader: Prof. Dr. Robert von Friedeburg

History

‘Reason of state’ or ‘reason of princess’?

 

Cultural Classification Systems in Transition

The comparative study of cultural classification systems - that is, the ways in which members of particular societies classify cultural products and develop corresponding rules of behavior and practices - constitutes a very challenging, emerging field of research. It can greatly improve our understanding of the social nature of artistic valuation processes and practices, and, moreover, it can shed light on underlying, broader processes of social and cultural change. This research program aims at clarifying and qualifying the changes that seem to have occurred in the classification of cultural products in (different) western societies.

Period: 2003-2012

Research leader: Prof.dr. Susanne Janssen

Team: Dr. Giselinde Kuipers, Dr. Marc Verboord, Pauwke Berkers, Femke van Hest, Annemarie Kersten, Alex van Venrooij, Vaughn Schmutz

Arts and Culture Studies / Media and Communication

Cultural Classification Systems in Transition

 

Axes

The goal of AXES is to develop tools that provide various types of users with new engaging ways to interact with audiovisual libraries, helping them discover, browse, navigate, search and enrich archives. In particular, apart from a search-oriented scheme, we will explore how suggestions for audiovisual content exploration can be generated via a myriad of information trails crossing the archive. This will be approached from three perspectives (or axes): users, content, and technology.

Research leaders: Prof. dr. Henri Beunders

Team: Martijn Kleppe MA, Gert Goris

History & Media and Communication

 Axes

 

PoliMedia - Interlinking MultiMedia for the analysis of media coverage of political debates

Analysing media coverage across several types of media-outlets is a challenging task for (media) historians. Up until now, the focus has been on newspaper articles: being generally available in digital, computer-readable format, these can be studied relatively easily. Cross-media comparisons between different types of media-outlets have however rarely been undertaken, even though such comparisons have top priority on the wish-list of (media) historians as this could give better insight into the choices that different media-outlets make. The PoliMedia project aims to showcase the potential of cross-media analysis for research in the humanities, by (i) curating automatically detected semantic links between four data sets of different media types, and (ii) developing a demonstrator application that allows researchers to deploy such an interlinked collection for quantitative and qualitative analysis of media coverage of debates in the Dutch parliament.

Period: 2012-2013

Research leaders: Prof. dr. Henri Beunders

Team: Martijn Kleppe MA, Max Kemman MSc, TU Delft, VU en het Nederlands Instituut voor Beeld en Geluid

History & Media and Communication

http://www.polimedia.nl/

 

Community Museums Past & Present

The present research is about integration processes and the interaction between political and museological agendas; about the evolution of the canon from tangible to intangible heritage; and about new exhibition techniques and ICT applications inside and outside the museum. All these developments converge in the community museum and will redefine it in the 21th century.

Period: 2008–2012

Research leaders: Prof. Dr. M.E. Halbertsma, Prof. Dr. P.Th. van de Laar, Prof. Dr. M. Jacobs

Arts and Culture Studies

Community Museums Past & Present

 

Globalisation and Cultural Heritage

Up until 1945, collecting and preserving cultural heritage in public or semi-public institutions such as museums, archives, libraries, listed monuments, and archaeological sites was an activity carried out largely in the West. In the last twenty years, developments in communication and transport have made cultural heritage available to a world public.

This proposal will analyse and clarify recent global developments in cultural heritage and its institutions, on both a macro- and micro-scale. The connection between globalisation and cultural heritage will be analysed in two separate publications: a monograph on fundamental theoretical and conceptual aspects of globalisation and cultural heritage, and a dissertation on cultural tourism in the Black Atlantic and its implications for heritage institutions in Africa and the Caribbean.

Period: 2005-2009

Research leaders: Prof. dr. Marlite Halbertsma and prof. dr. Alex van Stipriaan Luïscius

Arts and Culture Studies

Globalisation and Cultural Heritage